Cancer Forums and News by PhD's


News | Forums Register

Go Back   Cancer Forums and News by PhD's > Cancer Forums and News

Cancer News

Breast
Colon
Kidney
Leukemia
Liver
Lung
Melanoma
Mesothelioma
Myeloma
Neck
Pancreatic
Prostate


Cancer Review

Breast
Colon
Kidney
Leukemia
Liver
Lung
Melanoma
Mesothelioma
Myeloma
Pancreatic
Prostate


Recent Forum Topics

 
Radiation
Small molecules in the blood might gauge radiation effects after exposure
By Dross at 2013-02-26 23:50
 

Currently, doctors have no way to accurately measure damage to the body soon after a person is exposed to ionizing radiation.
It is therefore difficult to know whether a person is likely to suffer serious effects after an occupational or accidental exposure.
This animal study shows that radiation exposure alters the levels of certain small molecules in the blood, perhaps offering a reliable measure of damage to the body.

read more | 2 comments | 2294 reads

The Three Rs Of Cancer Survival
By gdpawel at 2011-05-31 07:06
 

Solid tumours such as brain tumours are highly resistant to chemotherapyterm and radiation. One reason for this is a ‘reduce, reuse, recycle’ strategy that these tumours use to survive treatment. By developing a cancer drug that targets this recycling pathway, Malaghan Institute of Medical Research scientists have struck upon a novel approach for combating otherwise resistant and aggressive cancers.

read more | 19830 reads

Targeted radiation therapy can control limited cancer spread
By Dross at 2008-08-12 21:42
 

Precisely targeted radiation therapy can eradicate all evidence of disease in selected patients with cancer that has spread to only a few sites, suggests the first published report from an ongoing clinical trial.

In the August 15, 2008, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, (published online August 12) researchers from the University of Chicago Medical Center report that targeted radiation therapy had completely controlled all signs of cancer in 21 percent of patients who had five or fewer sites of metastaticterm disease.

"This was proof of principle in patients who had failed the standard therapies and had few, if any, remaining options," said the study's senior author, Ralph Weichselbaum, MD, professor and chairman of radiation and cellular oncology at the University of Chicago Medical Center. "We had encouraging results, including several long-term survivors, in patients with stage-IV cancers that had spread to distant sites."

read more | 1078 reads

Hazards of CT scans overstated
By Dross at 2007-12-02 09:07
 

College Park, MD (November 30, 2007) – Concerns over possible radiation effects of CT scans detailed in a report yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine should not scare people away from getting medically needed CT scans, as the scans play a critical role in saving the lives of thousands of people every day, according to an official with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM).

In a statement issued Friday, Dr. John M. Boone, chairman of AAPM’s science council, says that the “science community remains divided” over the radiation dose effects of CT scans and that the findings in the Journal article were based on “flawed assumptions” and were not conclusive. While agreeing with the Journal article’s authors, Drs. David Brenner and Eric Hall, that CT scans should only be used judiciously and when medically necessary, Boone says CT experts in the AAPM “feel that much of the message of this article may be misconstrued or misunderstood by the press or by the public who may not be experts in CT.”

read more | 2 comments | 2171 reads

Diet high in meat, fat and refined grains linked to risk for colon cancer recurrence, death
By Dross at 2007-08-15 03:38
 

Patients treated for colon cancer who had a diet high in meat, refined grains, fat and desserts had an increased risk of cancer recurrence and death compared with patients who had a diet high in fruits and vegetables, poultry and fish, according to a study in the August 15 issue of JAMA.

Previous research has indicated that diet and other lifestyle factors have a significant influence on the risk of developing colon cancer. However, few studies have assessed the influence of diet on colon cancer recurrence and survival, according to background information in the article.

Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, M.D., M.P.H., of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, and colleagues examined the influence of two distinct dietary patterns on cancer recurrence and survival in a group of 1,009 stage III colon cancer patients (cancer present in the colon and lymph nodes) enrolled in a clinical trial of postoperative chemotherapyterm in addition to other treatment. Patients reported dietary intake using a food frequency questionnaire during and six months after supplemental chemotherapy. Two major dietary patterns were identified, prudent and Western. The prudent pattern was characterized by high intakes of fruits and vegetables, poultry, and fish; the Western pattern was characterized by high intakes of meat, fat, refined grains, and dessert.

read more | 1812 reads

U-M to use new device that detects small movements during radiation
By Dross at 2007-08-07 20:43
 

U-M to use new device that detects small movements during radiation

treatment for prostate cancer

 

Calypso system shows when patient's breathing, other movement changes

tumor location, impacting treatment

 

ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Radiation for cancer treatment involves targeting

intense beams in a very precise fashion to a relatively small area. But

despite efforts to align a patient beforehand, a cough, a wiggle, a deep

read more | 1415 reads

Antiprotons Four Times More Effective than Protons for Cell Irradiation
By Dross at 2007-03-09 21:55
 

A pioneering experiment at CERN1 with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons.

“We have taken the first step towards a novel treatment for cancer. The results show that antiprotons are four times more effective than protons at terminating live cells. Although it still has to be compared with other existing methods, it is a breakthrough in this area of investigation.” says Michael Doser at CERN, one of the scientists collaborating on the experiment. ACE brings together a team of experts in the fields of physics, biology, and medicine from 10 institutes around the world.

read more | 1440 reads

Breast cancer survivors experience long-term heart disease risk from radiotherapy
By Dross at 2007-03-07 05:20
 

 

 

Women who were treated with radiation for breast cancer during the 1980s may be at an increased risk for heart disease compared with the general population, according to a new study in the March 7 Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Despite this increased risk of heart disease, radiation therapy has been previously shown to improve the chances of surviving breast cancer.

Breast cancer patients treated with radiation therapy during the 1970s are thought to have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but those treatment procedures are now considered obsolete. However, studies on the association between more modern radiation therapies and cardiovascular disease in breast cancer survivors have been inconclusive.

read more | 1525 reads

Surgery and adjuvant therapy may work for pancreatic cancer
By Dross at 2007-01-24 02:31
 

 

In the largest single-institution retrospective study to date, researchers at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center have shown that giving patients both radiation and chemotherapyterm after completely removing invasive pancreatic cancer may improve overall survival rates. The study's lead author, a radiation oncology resident in Rochester, Michele Corsini, M.D., presented the findings Saturday, Jan. 20, at the 2007 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. The American Cancer Society reports that while the incidence of pancreatic cancer has decreased over the last few years, it remains the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death. Pancreatic cancer, which has a very poor prognosis, killed more than 32,000 people in the United States last year. "We are constantly looking for ways to improve the prognosis of patients with cancers such as this," says Robert Miller, M.D., co-primary investigator and a radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic. "Our findings show that surgery should be complemented by both radiation and chemotherapy for best results." In the study, the team of surgeons, oncologists and radiation oncologists from Mayo's Arizona and Minnesota campuses examined the records of 472 consecutively-treated patients. The patients all had surgery with negative margins (some healthy tissue cut out around the cancerous cells), between 1975 and 2005, to remove pancreatic adenocarcinomaterm. They excluded patients who had metastaticterm cancer, tumors that could not be removed or were not removed entirely (positive surgical margins), or indolent (slow growing) tumor types. Ultimately 454 patients were included in the final comparison of patients who received adjuvant therapyterm with those who had not. More than half (274) received concurrent radiation and chemotherapy following surgery and 50 percent survived two years, with 28 percent surviving at least five years. The researchers report more than one-third (180) received no additional therapy after surgery, and the comparative survival rates were significantly less, at 39 percent and 17 percent in two and five years, respectively. Additional chemotherapy after concurrent radiation and chemotherapy seemed to have an even greater effect on survival (61 percent and 34 percent survived two and five years), but only 28 patients received that combination, not enough for the researchers to draw a firm conclusion about its effectiveness. Drs. Miller and Corsini and their fellow researchers think these findings are important to clinicians worldwide. "While long-term outcomes with pancreatic cancer are generally poor," Dr. Corsini says, "our findings show that including both chemotherapy and radiation following surgery may significantly improve patient survival rates." Mayo currently uses a treatment strategy for most patients that includes a combination of radiation and chemotherapy after surgery.

read more | 11 comments | 4166 reads

Adding radiation decreases breast cancer recurrence
By Dross at 2007-01-23 22:43
 

 

Radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery for breast cancer reduces recurrence and prevents development of additional breast tumors in older women with early stage breast disease, according to a new study. Published in the March 1, 2007 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that women also benefit from the recommended five years of tamoxifen treatment for hormone responsive tumors. Among women over 65 and treated with breast conserving surgery, the risk of local or regional recurrence increased up to 3.5 times if they did not receive radiation after their surgery. Great strides have been made in breast cancer treatment. Breast conserving surgery in combination with radiotherapy and mastectomy provide women with two good options for their initial treatment. Augmenting surgery with hormone modulating drugs, such as tamoxifen, further improves survival and reduces recurrence. Women over 65 are at the highest risk for breast cancer and make up half of those diagnosed. However, they are less likely to receive standard therapy, particularly radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery, than younger women. Making treatment recommendations for older patients, who may have more comorbidities than younger patients, is complicated by under-representation of older women in clinical trials and prognostic studies.

read more | 5 comments | 1782 reads

Prostate Cancer Basics
By HCat at 2007-01-07 02:11

The Androgen Receptor

   The Androgen Receptor (AR) is a protein inside of certain cells that can bind or capture the androgen hormones testosterone and the more active metabolite 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Once the receptor binds one of the hormones, it causes the receptor to become active and stimulate production of certain proteins inside cells such as PSA.

It is known that AR is required for the normal development of the prostate. If a male animal has no AR, then the prostate will not be created of will be very small when he is born.

read more | 25649 reads

Syndicate content
 
Search

sponsored links




Donate


Newsletter



Subscribe to our newsletter to receive info on our site or upcoming clinical trials
Email

Confirm your email address

HTML format
State

Please select the newsletters you want to sign up to:

  • Cancerfocus
    Receive updates from Cancerfocus.
  • Breast
  • Colon
  • Kidney
  • Leukemia
  • Liver
  • Lung
  • Melanoma
  • Mesothelioma
  • Myeloma
  • Neck
  • Pancreatic
  • Prostate




Syndicate
Syndicate content


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:20 PM.